Group News

"In the past ten years, we have been emphasizing prevention for many forms of heart disease,” says Dr. Edward Schuster, assistant clinical professor of Cardiology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia. "With a healthy diet, no smoking and proper medication, we have cut the death rate from coronary events by 50 percent. In Fairfield County, where Columbia has an affiliate hospital, this figure has dropped by an impressive 80 percent, indicating that lifestyle changes can have a big effect."
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One of the most advanced and comprehensive in the world
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David Kalfa, MD, PhD, has received a grant from the CHD Coalition to create and test a new type of heart valve that can grow and conform to the patient’s anatomy over time. Such a device would benefit neonates, children and young adults with congenital heart disease, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and greatly improving their quality of life.
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The Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Comprehensive Care Center at NYP/Columbia is making great strides in the treatment of children with this relatively rare diagnosis. In 2014, the hospital received accreditation as a Center of Comprehensive Care by the National PH Association. Established 20 years ago, Columbia’s program continues to be one of the largest in the world, drawing patients across the United States and from other countries.
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In February 2017, NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital was verified as a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center by the American College of Surgeons. “This honor sets our program apart from others in the region,” says Steven Stylianos, MD, Director of the Trauma Center and chief of Pediatric Surgery.
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The Heartmate III system
NYP/Columbia is one of the leading centers in the world for patients with end-stage heart disease, and one of the first to allow those with end-stage heart failure to benefit from Heartmate 3. This new left ventricle assist device (LVAD) takes over the pumping action of the heart, moving oxygen-rich blood throughout the body.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

Studies Conflict Regarding Anesthesia in Infants

New data on potential effects of anesthesia on fetal and infant brain development raised concerns at the October Clinical Congress of the American College of Clinical Surgeons. Steven Stylianos, MD, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center and Surgeon-in-Chief at NYP/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital interprets the new studies, along with Lena S. Sun, MD, Chief, Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology at NYP/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and a leading authority in this field.
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In December 2016, a retrospective study from the Mayo Clinic indicated that a surgeon can safely be responsible for two overlapping procedures when critical parts of the procedures are not coincident. The study of overlapping operations showed no difference in patient outcomes, but increased effectiveness and time management. Paul Kurlansky, MD, Associate Director of Columbia’s Center for Innovation and Outcomes Research at NYP/Columbia, stresses that there is a big difference between overlapping and concurrent operations. With overlapping procedures, "surgeons cannot be booked to perform critical parts of two operations at the same time," he said. Craig Smith, MD, surgeon-in-chief, NYP/Columbia told Medscape Medical News has been performing overlapping operations routinely for more than 30 years, and he believes his judgment should be trusted with regard to when and how to do them.
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A recent study published in Circulation shows that patients who take their medication faithfully have dramatically better long-term outcomes, regardless of whether they have CABG or PCI. However, among the non-adherent group, CABG patients fared better with fewer major adverse cardiac events in the years after surgery. “This study shows how important it is to get to know your patients and find out how well they comply with medication,” says Paul Kurlansky, MD, who led the study and is currently director of research for Columbia HeartSource.
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